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[ITRDBFOR] Two MS assistantships at Huxley College, Western Washington University


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  • From: Andy Bunn <Andy.Bunn AT wwu.edu>
  • To: "itrdbfor AT itrdbfor.org" <itrdbfor AT itrdbfor.org>
  • Subject: [ITRDBFOR] Two MS assistantships at Huxley College, Western Washington University
  • Date: Fri, 15 Nov 2013 18:12:51 +0000
  • Accept-language: en-US

I have funding for two masters students to work as part of a team building
multi-millennial temperature reconstructions using fine-scale topographic
data and remote sensing to model the climate-sensitivity of high-elevation
bristlecone pines in the Great Basin. Full funding is available through a
mixture of research and teaching assistantships. The ideal students will be
independent, highly motivated, and possess research and field experience. The
ability to do remote fieldwork at high elevation is a must as is prior
experience with GIS or Remote Sensing. Prior experience with dendrochronology
is desired but not necessary. The students will get to work with a fantastic
team of collaborators from the University of Arizona.

Interested students should contact me
(andy.bunn AT wwu.edu<mailto:andy.bunn AT wwu.edu>)
with an email that gives short description of prior research and field
experience as well as GPA and GRE scores (if taken).

Visit the Huxley Tree-Ring Lab webpage to learn more about the research going
on in the lab as well as the MSc programs at Huxley:
http://huxley.wwu.edu/huxley-tree-ring-laboratory<https://huxley.wwu.edu/huxley-tree-ring-laboratory>

http://huxley.wwu.edu/graduate-programs<https://huxley.wwu.edu/graduate-programs>

The students would most likely be admitted to the environmental sciences
program but geography is possible for the right candidate.

Further Reading:
A popular science article describing the GIS aspects of this research is
available here:
http://www.esri.com/esri-news/arcnews/winter1213articles/gis-and-ancient-trees-reveal-past-temperatures-and-climate-change


Two recent peer-reviewed papers of interest are:
Salzer, M.W., Bunn, A.G., Graham, N.E., and M.K. Hughes. 2013. Five millennia
of paleotemperature from tree-rings and treeline change in the Great Basin
USA. Climate Dynamics. doi: 10.1007/s00382-013-1911-9.
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00382-013-1911-9


Bunn, A.G., M.K. Hughes, and M.W. Salzer. 2011. Topographically modified
tree-ring chronologies as a potential means to improve paleoclimate
inference. Climatic Change. doi: 10.1007/s10584-010-0005-5.
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10584-010-0005-5


About Western and Huxley:

Western Washington University is ranked as the top public comprehensive
university in the Pacific Northwest. With about 15,000 students, WWU is
located in beautiful Bellingham, close to both the Cascade Mountains and the
Salish Sea; it is about midway between Seattle, Washington and Vancouver,
British Columbia. Its mission is to serve the State of Washington and beyond
by bringing together individuals of diverse backgrounds and perspectives in
an inclusive, student-centered university that develops the potential of
learners and the well-being of communities. Western’s Huxley College of the
Environment is the oldest interdisciplinary environmental studies college in
the U.S. It is known nationally and internationally for its excellence in
educating the next generation of environmental leaders. Huxley’s academic
programs reflect a broad view of the physical, biological, social and
cultural world.



  • [ITRDBFOR] Two MS assistantships at Huxley College, Western Washington University, Andy Bunn, 11/15/2013

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